A Forgotten Building in a Deserted Village

Tucked away in the fold of the wildflower banks where our horses graze is a small building that rarely gets a second glance if it is noticed at all. Semi-derelict and difficult to reach, its appearance offers no clues of its historic importance – important only to the history of the farm upon whose land it was built. Further up the valley the landscape offers some hints of its past use: a dried-up watercourse that only shows up after heavy rain; an old, crumbling pack-bridge that seems to lead nowhere.  It is only when the building is explored does its purpose become realised.Dornford Old Pump House watermarkDornford Old Pump House (21) watermark

The farm and its associated barns today seem isolated and remote by south of England standards, set high on the hill and away from roads. However, during the early medieval period it was a thriving community which had disappeared by late medieval times possibly due to the Black Death. By 1700 only a farm was left standing. In 1800 this was replaced by the present buildings although the 350+ year old dovecote and stable block both remain from those early days. All are now protected and their architectural features recorded. I can find no such protection or detail of the little pump house – for that is what this is – out of sight in the valley below. Yet it is a little gem!

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The seventeenth century stable block lies empty

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Arched entrance to the old pump house

Probably built at the same time as the new farmhouse, the pump house would most likely have provided power for the barns as well as pumping water. What is fascinating about the building is that it still has its paddle wheel and much of its mechanism in place.

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The wheel – made from iron – is still in place

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Some parts of the building look as if they were deserted yesterday

Visiting the site isn’t for the faint-hearted. At this time of year, it is necessary to fight a way through chest height stinging nettles and to crawl through narrow and low passageways. Once inside, however, the architectural detail is delightful with its chamfered chambers and arched entrance and exit. Like all deserted places it is important to be vigilant at all times and not just in case of falling masonry. It’s just as important to keep an eye on what’s happening at ground level – this old well shaft, its cover rotten, waits to trap the unwary.

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Tall weeds almost totally hide the entrance to the building

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The well shaft with its rotten cover

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Visiting The Exmoor Society

Devotees of Exmoor, a National Park in Britain’s West Country, who want to learn more of its past and wildlife will find a friendly welcome at the Exmoor Society’s new headquarters.  Closely associated with Dulverton since its inception in 1958, it has recently moved to its new location within the town centre.Exmoor Society HQ (13)   copyright

A pictorial map filling the whole of one wall draws your attention as you enter the building, beautifully illustrated with iconic Exmoor animals and birds: Red Deer, Exmoor Ponies and Buzzards to name a few.

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Leading from the map is a room where visitors are able to look at old copies of the Exmoor Review, published annually and other archive material.  A timeline charting the period from the 1950s to the present day stretches along a wall lined with seats and work tables and makes fascinating reading in its own right.  Exmoor Society HQ (4)   copyright

The library’ shelves are stacked with books, many rare and out of print and covering every aspect of Exmoor life.  These are a great resource not just for the serious student of Exmoor but also for those that just want to dip into the pages of one that catches the eye.  Some titles, where there are several copies, are for sale.Exmoor Society HQ (12)   copyright

With over fifty years of collected material, the Exmoor Society has a wealth of information some of which, in the past, has not been readily available to see.  In 2014 funding was acquired for an Outreach Archivist, Dr Helen Blackman, to catalogue and resolve these issues.  Her progress can be followed on Twitter @ExSocArchivist.

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One of the greatest bequests to the society was all of the papers, drawings and paintings of Hope Bourne who became world famous for self-sufficient living in a caravan in a remote part of the moor.  Much of the material is in a fragile state but reproductions commissioned now show the beauty of her work.  The society has recently published a book showing some of her paintings, many for the very first time entitled Eloquence in Art and this can be purchased either at Dulverton or online.Exmoor Society HQ (14)   copyright

The Exmoor Society aims to reach everyone with an interest in Exmoor, including the landowners and people that live and work on the moor.  It takes its message to numerous shows and exhibitions and also leads walks throughout the year.Exford Show 2014 (9)   copyright

To find out more about the Exmoor Society drop into Dulverton or take a look at its website by clicking the link here.